Best Folder Encryptor Has Updated to Version 16.97

The professional file and folder encryption software – Best Folder Encryptor has been updated to version 16.97. The new version fixed bug that the control board cannot be closed after a Flash- and Hiding-encrypted folder is opened because of misjudgment, made some improvements and optimization, and several minor bug fixes. For more details about Best Folder Encryptor, please read the following content.

More about Best Folder Encryptor 16.97

File Name: Best Folder Encryptor

Version: 16.97

File Size: 10.04MB

Category: Folder Encryption, File Encryption

Language: English

License: Trial version

System Requirements: Win XP/vista/Win 7/Win 8/Win 10

Released on: Oct.08, 2017

Download Address: http://www.dogoodsoft.com/best-folder-encryptor/free-download.html

What’s New in This Version:

– Fixed bug the control board cannot be closed after a Flash- and Hiding-encrypted folder is opened because of misjudgment.

– Minor bug fixes.

* The new software interface.

* Some improvements and optimization.

* Better display of encryption records.

* The new disk mirroring.

– Fixed bug that the encrypted folder cannot be closed after it is opened in some cases.

– Fixed bug with disguise failure after opening a disguised folder.

– Fixed bug with wrong record after a folder is encrypted.

+ Added the drag-and-drop feature to encrypt.

– Fixed bug displayed in the software interface.

– Fixed bug with duplicate records when performing First Aid for Flash- and Hiding-encryted folders.

* Better dealing with the error files when decrypting a Full-encrypted folder.

* Security and usability improvements.

Best Folder Encryptor Has Updated to Version 16.97

Why Choose Best Folder Encryptor

Best Folder Encryptor is a professional file and folder encryption software. It features superfast with high security and confidentiality. With the internationally advanced encryption algorithms, encryption methods and file system drivers, the encrypted files and folders cannot be decrypted without the correct password, and are prevented from copy, deletion or removal.

It is convenient to open and edit the encrypted folder or file with the Open feature, and you don’t have to re-encrypt the folder or file after use.

Besides, it supports many powerful features such as data shredding (file/folder shredding), completely hiding hard disks, disabling USB storage devices or set them as read-only, etc. All these make Best Folder Encryptor undoubtedly a flawless encryption software and the best helper.

American ISIS Recruits Down, but Encryption Is Helping Terrorists’Online Efforts, Says FBI Director

American ISIS Recruits Down, but Encryption Is Helping Terrorists'Online Efforts, Says FBI Director

The number of Americans traveling to the Middle East to fight alongside Islamic State has dropped, but the terrorist group’s efforts to radicalize people online is getting a major boost from encryption technology, FBI Director James Comey said Wednesday.

Since August, just one American a month has traveled or attempted to travel to the Middle East to join the group, compared with around six to 10 a month in the preceding year and a half, Mr. Comey told reporters in a round table meeting at FBI headquarters.

However, federal authorities have their hands full trying to counter Islamic State’s social media appeal. Of around 1,000 open FBI investigations into people who may have been radicalized across the U.S., about 80% are related to Islamic State, Mr. Comey said.

The increasing use of encrypted communications is complicating law enforcement’s efforts to protect national security, said Mr. Comey, calling the technology a “huge feature of terrorist tradecraft.”

The FBI director cited Facebook Inc.’s WhatsApp texting service, which last month launched end-to-end encryption in which only the sender and receiver are able to read the contents of messages.

“WhatsApp has over a billion customers—overwhelmingly good people but in that billion customers are terrorists and criminals,” Mr. Comey said. He predicted an inevitable “collision” between law enforcement and technology companies offering such services.

Silicon Valley leaders argue that stronger encryption is necessary to protect consumers from a variety of threats.

“While we recognize the important work of law enforcement in keeping people safe, efforts to weaken encryption risk exposing people’s information to abuse from cybercriminals, hackers and rogue states,” WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum wrote last month in a blog post accompanying the rollout of the stronger encryption technology. The company Wednesday declined to comment on Mr. Comey’s remarks.

The FBI also continues to face major challenges in unlocking phones used by criminals including terrorists, Mr. Comey said. Investigators have been unable to unlock around 500 of the 4,000 or so devices the FBI has examined in the first six month of this fiscal year, which began Oct. 1, he said.

“I expect that number just to grow as the prevalence of the technology grows with newer models,” Mr. Comey added.

A terrorist’s locked iPhone recently sparked a high-stakes legal battle between the Justice Department and Apple Inc.
After Syed Rizwan Farook and his wife killed 14 people and wounded 22 in a December shooting rampage in San Bernardino, Calif., FBI agents couldn’t unlock the phone of Mr. Farook—who, along with his wife, was killed later that day in a shootout with police.

The government tried to force Apple to write software to open the device, but the technology company resisted, saying that such an action could compromise the security of millions of other phones.

That court case came to an abrupt end in March, when the FBI said it no longer needed Apple’s help because an unidentified third party had shown it a way to bypass the phone’s security features.

Encryption; Friend of Freedom, Guardian of Privacy

The issue of government access to private encrypted data has been in the public eye since the San Bernardino shootings in December, 2015. When an iPhone was found the FBI requested that Apple write code to override the phone’s security features. The FBI was ultimately able to decrypt the phone without Apple’s assistance. However, the ensuing debate over encryption has just begun.

High profile criminal and national security issues serve to shed light on an issue which is pervasive throughout the country. Local governments presumably have thousands of devices they would like to decrypt for investigatory purposes as New York City alone has hundreds. Seeking a resolution and remembering the horrific terror attacks of September 11, 2001 New York State Assembly Bill A8093A is in committee and seeks to outlaw the sale of phones in the state which have encryption not by passable to law enforcement.

Encryption allows for the safe keeping and targeting dissemination of private thoughts and information without worry off judgment, retaliation or mistreatment. On a grander scale encryption prevents unchecked government oversight. It can be argued that encryption technology is a hedge against current and future totalitarian regimes. With a history of occupation and abuse of power it is no surprise that Germany and France are not pushing for encryption backdoors.

Backdoors in encrypted devises and software provide another avenue for unwelcome parties to gain access. Hackers are often intelligent, well-funded and act on their own, in groups and most harmfully with foreign entities. Holes have a way of being found and master keys have a way of being lost.

Senators Richard Burr and Diane Feinstein are undoubtedly well intended with their draft law entitled the Compliance with Court Orders Act of 2016. The act calls for providers of communication services including software publishers to decrypt data when served with a court order. The data would have to be provided in an intelligible format or alternatively technical assistance for its retrieval. Prosecutors have a need to gather evidence. Governments have a duty to prevent crime and acts of terror.

However, experts question the feasibility of building backdoors into all types of encryption as it comes in many forms and from a host of global providers. Further, there is concern that the measure, if adopted, will backfire as the targeting of backdoors by our adversaries is assured. Cyberwar in the form of illicit data collection, theft of trade secrets and access to infrastructure is all too common and may escalate as tensions rise between adversaries. Ransomware and cyber extortion have been spreading, most recently at hospitals, and the knowledge of the existence of backdoors will motivate those who seek unseemly profits.

Efforts to prosecute the accused, fight crime and terror are noble causes. However, government should be wise in the approach lest we weaken our shared defenses in the process. The big corporate names of Silicon Valley recognize the dangers of backdoors and are speaking out and lobbying against Senator Burr and Feinstein’s efforts. The draft legislation does ensure that the monetary cost of decrypting is paid to the, “covered entity.” However, the costs to society at large remain up for discussion.

Brooklyn case takes front seat in Apple encryption fight

Brooklyn case takes front seat in Apple encryption fight

The Justice Department said Friday it will continue trying to force Apple to reveal an iPhone’s data in a New York drug case, putting the Brooklyn case at the center of a fight over whether a 227-year-old law gives officials wide authority to force a technology company to help in criminal probes.

The government told U.S. District Judge Margo K. Brodie in Brooklyn that it still wants an order requiring Apple’s cooperation in the drug case even though it recently dropped its fight to compel Apple to help it break into an iPhone used by a gunman in a December attack in San Bernardino that killed 14 people.

“The government’s application is not moot and the government continues to require Apple’s assistance in accessing the data that it is authorized to search by warrant,” the Justice Department said in a one-paragraph letter to Brodie.

Apple expressed disappointment, saying its lawyers will press the question of whether the FBI has tried any other means to get into the phone in Brooklyn.

Apple had sought to delay the Brooklyn case, saying that the same technique the FBI was using to get information from the phone in California might work with the drug case phone, eliminating the need for additional litigation.

Federal prosecutors told Brodie on Friday that it would not modify their March request for her to overturn a February ruling concluding that the centuries-old All Writs Act could not be used to force Apple to help the government extract information from iPhones.

Magistrate Judge James Orenstein made the ruling after inviting Apple to challenge the 1789 law, saying he wanted to know if the government requests had created a burden for the Cupertino, California-based company.

Since then, lawyers say Apple has opposed requests to help extract information from over a dozen iPhones in California, Illinois, Massachusetts and New York.

In challenging Orenstein’s ruling, the government said the jurist had overstepped his powers, creating “an unprecedented limitation on” judicial authority.

It said it did not have adequate alternatives to obtaining Apple’s assistance in the Brooklyn case, which involves a phone with a different version of operating system than the phone at issue in the California case.

In a statement Friday, Justice Department spokeswoman Emily Pierce said the mechanism used to gain access in the San Bernardino case can only be used on a narrow category of phones.

“In this case, we still need Apple’s help in accessing the data, which they have done with little effort in at least 70 other cases when presented with court orders for comparable phones running iOS 7 or earlier operating systems,” she said.

Apple is due to file a response in the case by Thursday.

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

The FBI insists that encrypted products like the iPhone and encrypted online services will put people in harm’s way, especially in light of the ISIS-connected San Bernardino shooting late last year. That’s why the Bureau has been arguing for encryption backdoors that would be available to law enforcement agencies, and why it looked to coerce Apple to add a backdoor to iOS.

However, extensive reports that show the preparations ISIS made before hitting Paris and Brussels revealed the kind of encrypted products ISIS radicals used to stay in touch with central command. Unsurprisingly, these products are out of the FBI’s jurisdiction, and one in particular was one of the safest encrypted communication products you can find online. In fact,its original developers are suspected to have ties to the criminal underworld.

Telling the inside story of the Paris and Brussels attacks, CNN explains that ISIS cell members used a chat program called Telegram to talk to one another in the moments ahead of the attacks. Using data obtained from official investigations,CNN learned that just hours before the Bataclan theater was hit, one of the attackers had downloaded Telegram on a Samsung smartphone.

Police never recovered communications from the messaging app. Not only is Telegram encrypted end-to-end, but it also has a self destruct setting.

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

Conceived by Russian developers, the app is out of the FBI’s jurisdiction. But Telegram is the least problematic encrypted service for intelligence agencies looking to collect data and connect suspects. CNN also mentions a far more powerful app, one that hasn’t yet been cracked by law enforcement.

TrueCrypt is the app in question. One of the ISIS radicals who was captured by French police in the months leading to the mid-November Paris attacks revealed details about this program.

TrueCrypt resides on a thumb drive and is used to encrypt messages. French citizen and IT expert Reda Hame was instructed to upload the encrypted message to a Turkish file-sharing site. “An English-speaking expert on clandestine communications I met over there had the same password,” Hame told interrogators. “It operated like a dead letter drop.”

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

According to The New York Times, Hame was told not to send the message via email, so as to not generate any metadata that would help intelligence agencies connect him to other terrorists.

The ISIS technician also instructed Hame to transfer TrueCrypt from the USB key to a second unit once he reached Europe. “He told me to copy what was on the key and then throw it away,” Hame explained. “That’s what I did when I reached Prague.”

Hame made a long journey home from Turkey, making it look like he was a tourist visiting various cities in Europe. Whenever he reached a new place, he was to call a special number belonging to one of the masterminds behind the attacks, and he used a local SIM card to mark his location.

Forget iPhone encryption, the FBI can’t legally touch the software ISIS uses

The Times also mentions a secondary program that was installed on flash drives. Called CCleaner, the program can be used to erase a user’s online history on any computer.

If that’s not enough to show the level of sophistication of these bloody ISIS attacks on Europe and other targets, a story from The New Yorker sheds more light on TrueCrypt, a program whose creators can’t be forced to assist the FBI.

According to the publication, TrueCrypt was launched in 2004 to replace a program called Encryption for the Masses (E4M) developed long before the iPhone existed. Interestingly, the programmer who made it is Paul Le Roux, who also happens to be a dangerous crime lord, having built a global drug, arms and money-laundering cartel out of a base in the Philippines.

E4M is open-source, and so is TrueCrypt, meaning that their creators aren’t companies motivated by a financial interest to keep their security intact.

“TrueCrypt was written by anonymous folks; it could have been Paul Le Roux writing under an assumed name, or it could have been someone completely different,” Johns Hopkins Information Security Institute computer-science professor Matthew Green told The New Yorker.

The developers stopped updating it in 2014 for fear that Le Roux’s decision to cooperate with the DEA might cripple its security. Le Roux was arrested in Liberia on drug-trafficking charges in September 2012. But Green concluded in 2015 that TrueCrypt is still backdoor-free, which explains why ISIS agents still use it.

Google closing in on target of full encryption

Google is disclosing how much of the traffic to its search engine and other services is being protected from hackers as part of its push to encrypt all online activity.

Encryption shields 77 percent of the requests sent from around the world to Google’s data centers, up from 52 percent at the end of 2013, according to company statistics released Tuesday. The numbers cover all Google services except its YouTube video site, which has more than 1 billion users. Google plans to add YouTube to its encryption breakdown by the end of this year.

Encryption is a security measure that scrambles transmitted information so it’s unintelligible if intercepted by a third party.

Google began emphasizing the need to encrypt people’s online activities after confidential documents leaked in 2013 by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed that the U.S. government had been vacuuming up personal data transferred over the Internet. The surveillance programs exploited gaping holes in unencrypted websites.

While rolling out more encryption on its services, Google has been trying to use the clout of its influential search engine to prod other websites to strengthen their security.

In August 2014, Google revised its secret formula for ranking websites in its search order to boost those that automatically encrypted their services. The change meant websites risked being demoted in Google’s search results and losing visitors if they didn’t embrace encryption.

Google is highlighting its own progress on digital security while the FBI and Apple Inc. are locked in a court battle over access to an encrypted iPhone used by one of the two extremist killers behind the mass shootings in San Bernardino, California, in December.

Google joined several other major technology companies to back Apple in its refusal to honor a court order to unlock the iPhone, arguing that it would require special software that could be exploited by hackers and governments to pry their way into other encrypted devices.

In its encryption crusade, Google is trying to make it nearly impossible for government spies and other snoops from deciphering personal information seized while in transit over the Internet.

The statistics show that Google’s Gmail service is completely encrypted as long as the correspondence remains confined to Gmail. Mail exchanges between Gmail and other email services aren’t necessarily encrypted.

Google’s next most frequently encrypted services are maps (83 percent of traffic) and advertising (77 percent, up from just 9 percent at the end of 2013). Encryption frequency falls off for Google’s news service (60 percent) and finance (58 percent).

Mark Zuckerberg Defends Apple’s Stance On Encryption

Mark Zuckerberg Defends Apple’s Stance On Encryption

The real battle for data encryption on our mobile devices has heated up considerably over the past few weeks and is looking to come to a boil relatively soon as tech companies and industry moguls alike join Apple in its defense of encryption. This all began way back in 2013 when Edward Snowden became the whistleblower on the US government’s PRISM domestic spying program, revealing that our mobile devices might be feeding the government more information than anyone had thought of before. Ever since then, tech companies have been slowly locking down our personal information, whether it be adding two-step authorization on logins or actually encrypting the data stored on a mobile device. Google and Apple, among nearly 150 other big-name tech companies, petitioned President Obama to support data encryption nearly a year ago, and now it looks like that letter couldn’t have been more timely.

If you’ve been keeping up with the news lately you’ll know that the San Bernardino shooter used an encrypted iPhone, something Apple has been known for since enacting the standard some time ago. Joining Apple in its quest to secure our data was Google, who has begun requiring phones that ship with Android 6.0 Marshmallow to be fully encrypted, keeping your data secured from apparently even the FBI if they so desire to access it. While the FBI and Apple are currently in a legal battle for the future of encryption, company after company has begun piling on the FBI to get them to deal with the problem another way and save encryption and user’s privacy as a whole.

Facebook owner, CEO and multi-billionaire Mark Zuckerberg has joined this fight, alongside his company, and is fighting to keep encrypted phone sales from being banned in the US. This in addition to the alternative that the FBI has suggested in creating a backdoor in encryption methods for law enforcement, a move that completely removes the purpose of encryption in the first place. Such a move would eliminate the greatest security measure users have to secure their devices, and ultimately defeat the point of encryption in the first place. Zuckerberg’s support of encryption is a huge win for the tech community, and further helps back the opinions of people like John McAfee in stating that the FBI has fallen way behind the times and needs to resort to other methods of dealing with encryption than trying to remove it.

Best Disk Lock Has Been Updated to Version 2.62

The powerful data protection software-Best Disk Lock has been updated to version 2.62. There are many improvements in version 2.62, which are designed to make the program even easier to use. The latest version software not only improved the stability for disk elementary-lock, changed the Lock Log to Lock Record for easily unlocking, but also fixed the BUG that an error message occurred when the disk is opened after being unlocked in Windows XP.

Besides, six new features are introduced in this new version: added the feature to automatically open the disk when unlocking it, added the option for users that whether to recover the unlocked disk(s) to lock status, added the feature to automatically open the file or folder when unlocking it, added the option for users that whether to recover the unlocked file(s)  or folder(s) to lock status, added Lock Record for easily unlocking, added the feature Forbid using the unassigned drive letters for more control on USB storage devices.

Change Log of Best Disk Lock 2.60:

File Name: Best Disk Lock

Version: 2.62

File Size: 3.43MB

Category: System Security Software

Language: English

License type: Trial Version

OS Support: Win2000/XP/VISTA/Win 7/Win 8

Released on: Dec.22, 2015

Download Address: http://www.dogoodsoft.com/best-disk-lock/free-download.html

What’s New in This Version:

* Changed the Lock Log to Lock Record for easily unlocking.

– Fixed a BUG that an error message occurred when the disk is opened after being unlocked in Windows XP.

Why Choose Best Disk Lock:

Best Disk Lock Has Been Updated to Version 2.62

Best Disk Lock is a powerful utility that can not only completely hide disk partitions and CD-ROM drives on your PC, disable USB storage devices or set them as read-only, but also forbid using the unassigned drive letters . The partition with advanced-lock cannot be found in any environment by anyone else, so the security and confidentiality of your data on this partition can be ensured.

The feature Lock File is to change the access permissions of file, folder or disk in NTFS-formatted partitions, by which teh file/folder/disk will be prohibited or allowed to access. Besides, Best Disk Lock can configure the security of your computer system and optimize the system.

Your self-encrypting hard drive isn’t nearly as secure as you thought

Your self-encrypting hard drive isn't nearly as secure as you thought

If you want to keep your information away from hackers and snoops, whether it’s your Internet use, email, hard drive data or your backup, the best thing you can do is use encryption. Encryption scrambles your data and, in theory, the only way to unscramble it is to know the password. That’s why choosing a strong password no one can guess is important.

This is also what makes a ransomware virus that encrypts your files so dangerous. Without paying for the decryption password, you can’t get your files back. Learn three steps you can take to beat ransomware. Unfortunately for your security, encryption isn’t always a secure as you’d hope.

Without going into too much technical detail, there are a lot of ways that encryption can happen, from the method it uses to encrypt the data to how many bits it uses. For example, you’ll see 128-bit AES and 256-bit AES show up a lot in programs and Web encryption. There’s SHA-1 and SHA-2 from the NSA. For your router, you’ll see options like WEP, WPA TKIP, WPA2 AES and more.

Unfortunately, not all encryption is created equal. For centuries, mathematicians and cryptographers have been coming up with and breaking encryption schemes. As computers have gotten more powerful, encryption that should have taken centuries to crack can fail in seconds.

That’s why you don’t see much 64-bit AES anymore, why using WEP on your router is the same has having no encryption, and why large organizations are moving from SHA-1 to SHA-2 encryption.

Of course, this is way more than the average person should have to think about. You should be able to trust that every company is using the best encryption possible in the products you buy and use. Unfortunately, that often isn’t the case, and we just got a fresh reminder.

Encryption policy poorly worded by officer: Telecom Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad

Encryption policy poorly worded by officer: Telecom Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad

The government has blamed a junior official – a scientist — for the encryption policy fiasco, saying he was responsible for the poor and confusing wording of the document and failed to seek advice from his higher ups before making it public.

Several officials in the communications and IT Ministry that ET spoke to admitted that the timing of the release of the draft policy – just before Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s US visit — couldn’t have been worse, prompting its immediate withdrawal.

Speaking exclusively to ET, telecom minister Ravi Shankar Prasad, however, blamed poor wording for directing withdrawal of the policy, which gave an impression that subscribers could become legally liable to store messages exchanged throug WhatsApp, Facebook and Google among other social media platforms for up-to 90 days, and produce them before authorities if asked. The intent of the government was to make the social media and messaging companies liable to store information for the 90 day period.

“I read the draft. I understand that the manner in which it is written can lead to misconceptions. I have asked for the draft policy to be withdrawn and reworded,” Prasad said. “There was a misuse of word ‘users’ in the draft policy, for which the concerned officer has been taken to task.”

He explained that the wrong use of the phrase ‘users of encryption’ instead of ‘creators of encryption’ had led to all the confusion. Prasad added that the ‘scientist’, who was part of the expert committee under the Department of Information and Technology (Dei-TY), was responsible for the confusion. The expert panel had been tasked with framing of a national policy on ‘encryption’ which is crucial for the national policy on cyber security.

Internally, senior officials in the ministry admitted the timing of the draft policy release was all wrong with Modi set to travel to the US and meet, among others, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other tech giants as well as many from the Indian diaspora.

“This is bad timing for sure. Modi would have surely have faced very uncomfortable questions at what is expected to be very high profile visit,” one of the officials told ET. Another official said the official tasked with coordinating and putting the policy together should have shown either the joint secretary, secretary or someone in the minister’s office before releasing it for public consultation. “This is the basics, especially for something which could be controversial.

But it was messed up,” he said, adding that reworking the policy and putting it in the public domain could take around three weeks.

The government Tuesday was forced to withdraw the controversial ‘draft encryption policy’ just over 12 hours after making it public after it came under severe criticism, especially on social media, for its move to make individuals legally bound to retain personal chats/messages on social networking sites for 90 days and provide to law authorities, if asked.

The draft policy was met with severe criticism, citing invasion of privacy, forcing DeiTY to clarify within a few hours on Monday that chats on popular social networking sites like Whatsapp and Facebook were exempted. And Tuesday it withdrew it in its entirety.

Prasad urged citizens not to misunderstand the policy. “Firstly this is a draft policy not the final policy and we have sought the comments of all stakeholders. There has always been a need for a policy on encryption given the spurt in online transactions through net banking, ecommerce, and so on,” Prasad said.

“However, no attempt will ever be made to jeopardize the rights of netizens and this government’s commitment to social media and the rights of netizens is unwavering,” he added. Dismissing speculation that the government had withdrawn the policy owing to severe media backlash or political pressure, Prasad said the country needed a robust encryption policy for security reasons.

One of the officials cited above said that the essence of the reworked draft policy will remain same, but it will be reworded. “The final policy could also require the companies to set up servers in India,” he added.

According to sources, the Intelligence Bureau (IB) had demanded that government make it mandatory for all the companies to make keep data for up-to one year, but the ministry of communications and IT had brought it down to just 90 days.

The policy seeks to bring all creators of ‘encryption codes’ to register with the government. Secondly the department of IT will from time to time notify standardized algorithms which could be used by companies. “We will only standardize the algorithms based on global practices, the formula of encryption codes will remain with the creators only,” the official said.

At present, an internet service provider licence allows for encryption of only up-to 40 bits but banks, e-commerce companies and communication services use much higher levels of encryption codes.